Acetabular Labrum Tear

Hip Pain with Movement Coordination Impairments

Screen Shot 2018-03-14 at 7.41.40 AM.jpg

Occasionally mistaken for an adductor muscle strain, patients with hip labral tears will present with disabling anterior hip or groin pain often associated with a clicking sound or sensation. For more clinical findings click here!

Anatomy

        Image via Complete Anatomy 2018 by 3D4 Medical

      Image via Complete Anatomy 2018 by 3D4 Medical

Common Movement Fault

 If you suspect labral pathology consider assessing your patient for an anterior humeral movement fault. If the head of the humerus more readily glides anteriorly this can cause excessive stress to the anterior portion of the labrum. Prone hip extension is one way the therapist can assess for anterior humeral glide. ( Click image to watch 1-2 minute video )

If you suspect labral pathology consider assessing your patient for an anterior humeral movement fault. If the head of the humerus more readily glides anteriorly this can cause excessive stress to the anterior portion of the labrum. Prone hip extension is one way the therapist can assess for anterior humeral glide. (Click image to watch 1-2 minute video)

Special Tests

 The hip scour test can be useful during assessment to help rule out potential labral tear or degeneration! ( Click image to watch 1-2 minute video )

The hip scour test can be useful during assessment to help rule out potential labral tear or degeneration! (Click image to watch 1-2 minute video)

Treatment

 Restriction of hip posterior glide mobility can also contribute to imprecise movement of the head of the femur in the acetabulum potentially exacerbating the anterior femoral glide movement fault. Hip flexion mobilization with movement can help reduce this posterior glide restriction.  ( Click the image to watch 1-2 minute video )

Restriction of hip posterior glide mobility can also contribute to imprecise movement of the head of the femur in the acetabulum potentially exacerbating the anterior femoral glide movement fault. Hip flexion mobilization with movement can help reduce this posterior glide restriction.  (Click the image to watch 1-2 minute video)

Therapeutic Exercise

A good therapeutic exercise to follow hip flexion mobilization with movement would be the quadruped rock back; however, after mobility is improved, it is important to address gluteal strength along with motor control of the lower extremity! (Click image to watch 1-2 minute videos left | right)